Saturday, October 30, 2021

ELO Cant Get It Out My Head

 




ELO

ELDORADO






CAN'T GET IT OUT of MY HEAD

Electric Light Orchestra







Percy Sledge - When a Man Loves a Woman





WHEN a MAN LOVES a WOMAN

PERCY SLEDGE




 

Muscle Shoals Documentary Film

 





MUSCLE SHOALS

Full Movie





Aretha Franklin

Fame Studios

Muscle Shoals, Alabama





LITTLE RICHARD

with RICK HALL

FAME STUDIOS

MUSCLE SHOALS, ALABAMA



In 1961, the producer Rick Hall recorded “You Better Move On”—a loping, indignant song about a dude stuck in love with a woman who’s already promised herself to another—in a converted tobacco warehouse in Muscle Shoals, Alabama. The song was written and sung by Arthur Alexander, a bellhop from nearby Sheffield, and was later covered by the Rolling Stones, the Hollies, George Jones and Johnny Paycheck, and others. Alexander’s vocal sounds tired, as if he’s chosen to go on arguing but knows, in some awful and instinctive way, that he’s already lost the fight: “Can’t you understand, man, she’s my girl?” he sings. The words drift and disappear. His performance is defiant, but lonesome. It’s a soul song, but it’s country, too.

“You Better Move On” was enough of a hit for Hall and Alexander—it made it to No. 24 on the pop chart—that Hall was able to purchase a proper recording space: a boxy brown-and-beige building on Avalon Avenue, just a couple miles south of the Tennessee River, in an otherwise unremarkable stretch of town. fame Studios would eventually become known and coveted, globally, for its lush and tender sound. Hall, who died on Tuesday, at eighty-five, was its engineer and its keeper.

“At different points in time on this planet, there are certain places where there is a feel of energy,” Jimmy Cliff, the Jamaican ska and reggae musician, says in “Muscle Shoals,” a 2013 documentary about the studio. “At this certain point in time, for a number of years, this was Muscle Shoals.” I don’t know how to explain what was going on there, either—why so many remarkable records were cut in that room. The history of American music is punctuated by stories about places like this—strange, sacred spots, where certain metaphysical tensions briefly manifest and align. Clarksdale, Bakersfield, Macon. Muscle Shoals.

Hall turned the studio’s bathroom into a makeshift echo chamber. “If you had to take a crap or something in the bathroom, we had to stop the session until you got through,” he says in a taped interview from 2015. “We had to modify things back then. We had to improvise.” He breaks into a dry cackle, recalling the wildness of it all. The Swampers, the studio’s house band, played in a funky and particular way—loose-limbed and groove-oriented. Aretha Franklin later described their sound as “greasy.” (She also credited the studio with shifting the trajectory of her career: Hall helped her uncover a different, chunkier part of her voice.) Everything made there felt soft at the edges, mildewed, as if it had been left out in the rain for a couple of days. Pilgrims flocked to Alabama, hungry for some of that heavy air: Etta James, Wilson Pickett, Bobbie Gentry. In 1966, Percy Sledge recorded “When A Man Loves A Woman” there. It might be the best song we have about the devastations and capitulations of deep love—about the way we all string ourselves up for just a little more rapture. Duane Allman supposedly set up a pup tent in the parking lot of fame, just to be closer to whatever was happening inside. Even then, all that anybody knew for sure about fame’s odd and singular alchemy was that Hall was its principal. “My records were me, they were Rick Hall,” he said.

Hall was born on January 31, 1932, in Forest Grove, Mississippi. His father was a sharecropper, and Hall grew up sleeping on a straw bed, in a house with a dirt floor and no plumbing. His mother split when he was four. “We grew up like animals. That made me a little bitter, somewhat driven. I wanted to be special. I wanted to be somebody,” he explains in “Muscle Shoals.” He eventually got a job as an apprentice to a toolmaker, in Rockford, Illinois, and started playing in local bands. Later, he returned to the South—to Florence, Alabama—to work in an aluminum factory. After both his first wife and his father died within a two-week period, he suffered a kind of spiritual breakdown. “I freaked out. I became a drunk, a vagabond, a tramp,” he admitted. But Hall ultimately figured out a way to redirect his grief—to transform it into ambition.

In 1969, after a split with Hall, the Swampers—who were now working with Jerry Wexler, a partner in Atlantic Records—opened the rival Muscle Shoals Sound Studio, where the Staple Singers, Paul Simon, Bob Dylan, and many others later recorded. But Hall kept going at fame. In 1970, he produced the Osmonds’ “One Bad Apple,” which went to No. 1 and earned him a Grammy nomination for Producer of the Year. He was inducted into the Alabama Music Hall of Fame, in 1985, and received the Grammy Trustees Award, in 2014.

Muscle Shoals remains remarkable not just for the music made there but for its unlikeliness as an epicenter of anything; that a tiny town in a quiet corner of Alabama became a hotbed of progressive, integrated rhythm and blues still feels inexplicable. Whatever Hall conjured there—whatever he dreamt, and made real—is essential to any recounting of American ingenuity. It is a testament to a certain kind of hope.








Slip Away - Clarence Carter

 



Clarence Carter





SLIP AWAY

Clarence Carter


"Slip Away", arranged and produced by Rick Hall, was recorded at FAME Studios in a mid-1967 recording session whose players, besides vocalist Clarence Carter himself on guitar, included visiting American Sound Studio (Memphis) session regulars Spooner Oldham on keyboards and Tommy Cogbill whose bass riffs on the track would become iconic in the canon of Southern soul: other session players included drummer Roger Hawkins and - in one of his first session jobs - Duane Allman on slide guitar. Despite the track's credentials, Rick Hall decided against releasing "Slip Away": that the track would eventually serve as the B-side of the April 1968 single release "Funky Fever" was according to Carter his own suggestion, made in the hopes that "Slip Away" would prove to be a "flip hit".







Gregg Allman Band

SLIP AWAY







ARETHA FRANKLIN

At MUSCLE SHOALS







MUSCLE SHOALS

Official Trailer







DUANE ALLMAN & RICK HALL

Muscle Shoals




















Friday, October 29, 2021

Because The Night Springsteen Patti Smith Merchant

 





Patti Smith

"BECAUSE The NIGHT"






Patti Smith


"BECAUSE The NIGHT"

The Patti Smith Group

Written by Bruce Springsteen and Patti Smith

1978


"Because the Night" is a song written by Bruce Springsteen and Patti Smith that was first released in 1978 as a single from the Patti Smith Group 1978 album, Easter. This version rose to No. 13 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, as well as No. 5 in the United Kingdom, and helped propel sales of Easter to mainstream success.

The song has subsequently been covered by numerous artists, and at least two of these cover versions have been chart hits. A 1992 version of the song by Co.Ro was a hit in several countries in Europe and South America. It reached No. 1 in Spain and the Top 10 in Belgium, France, Greece and Italy. The following year, a live acoustic version was recorded by 10,000 Maniacs for MTV Unplugged. This recording reached No. 11 on the Billboard Hot 100, making it the highest charting version of the song in the U.S.

In 1987, the song was ranked No. 116 on NME magazine's list of "The Top 150 Singles of All Time". It remains the best-known song of Smith's catalog.







BECAUSE The NIGHT

10,000 MANIACS

MTV Unplugged

Featuring Natalie Merchant on Lead Vocals
















BECAUSE The NIGHT

BRUCE SPRINSTEEN & The "E STREET BAND"

Live - HOUSTON, TEXAS

1978









Spanky n Our Gang Sunday Will

 





SPANKY & OUR GANG





SUNDAY WILL NEVER BE THe SAME

Spanky & Our Gang





LAZY DAY

SPANKY & OUR GANG











21st Century Music SUCKS !!!

 




"BECAUSE the PAST 20 YEARS MUSIC SUCKS" !!!!


Yep, it's oh so true. The music of the past 20 - 30 Years SUCKS !!! That's all there is to it.
I've said this over and over again. It really misifies me. I just don't get it? What the Hell Happened to Music? It Sucks these days.

Yes, I came across the above image on a Facebook music page. I just had to make a comment to this image of the girl looking at her vinyl records, with her thoughts of "It's 2021, and I'm still listening to 60s 70s Music." If that's a question, the answer is oh so very easy. "The music today Sucks!" Period.

And if the girl is wondering why she is still listening to her records from the 60s & 70s, easy again. The music is great. "Oh my God, it was so good. And thank God for it." That we don't have to listen to all the Crap (so-called music) they make these days, and have been making for about 30 years now, ever since they stopped making great; Pop, R&B, Rock n' Roll, and vocal music, like they made in the 1960s and 70s, two decades that brought us the greatest music ever. And music, that Thank the good Lord all those great R&B, Pop, and Rock n' Roll artists of the sixties and 1970s musical artist made. Thank you all so much. Thank you to people like: the late great Francis Albert Sinatra , Al Green, Marvin Gaye, Berry Gordy, Dianna Ross and The Supremes, Smokey Robinson of The Miracles, Paul MCarteny, John Lennon, George Harrison and Ringo Starr, The Beatles, Andy Willians, Henry Mancini, Burt Bacarach, Dionne Warwick, Dusty Springfiel, Stevie Wonder, Tony Bennett, David Bowie, Eric Clapton, Pete Townsend, Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Charlie Watts, and the  Rolling Stones Teddy Pendergrass, Harold Melvin, the O'Jays, The Stylistics, The Delfonics, Billy Paul, and all the great musical artists of the awesome Philadelphia Sounds. The list goes on and on. I could be here for the next month, trying to write down all the great music and musical artist of 1960s and 70s America, and British music. It was an incrediable time, with the most wonderful music ever. Music that made you feel good, not like the Crappy downer music they have been making since the 1990s and to presnet day. "I just don't get it?"How the Hell did we go from all the great music made in the 60s and 70s and even into the 1980s, and then just all of a sudden Stop? I really don't get it. "Can someone please explain it to me?" and don't go telling me, to be open midned, or that I'm too old and this is the younger generation. The younger generation? Well the younger generation has SHit for music. It just Sicks! No good. The music has is devoid of rythym and medoldy, and any rhyme or reason what-so-ver. "It Sucks." Plain and simple. Will they (musci makers) ver make any good music ver again? Who knows?

All I can say, is Thank God for records, the ones I have, and Thank You God for all of those great musicians, music writers and composers, and all the great music makers of the awesome decades of the 1960s and 1970s. The greatest era in music of all-time, bar none.

Basta!

DBZ










TURQUOISE MARILYN







DANIEL'S WORLD ART TEES










Dear Mr Fantasy - Traffic Winwood

 





TRAFFIC






DEAR Mr. FANTASY

Traffic



Along with the theme song for the movie Go Ask Alice by The Jefferson Airplane, 
Dear Mr. Fantasy was another prominent song on the films soundtrack. The used to show us movies in High School to try and help the young teenage students from doing drugs. Go Ask Alice was one of those movies they showed the student body at Becton Regional High School (my high school)  
Go Ask Alice. Yes, I think it was affective.








JEFFERSON AIRPLANE 







Jefferson Airplane

WHITE RABBIT




GO ASK ALICE


Go Ask Alice is a 1971 book about a teenage girl who develops a drug addiction at age 15 and runs away from home on a journey of self-destructive escapism. Attributed to "Anonymous", the book is in diary form, and was originally presented as being the edited "real diary" of the unnamed teenage protagonist. Questions about the book's authenticity and true authorship began to arise in the late 1970s, and it is now generally viewed as a found manuscript-styled fictional work written by Beatrice Sparks, a therapist and author who went on to write numerous other books purporting to be real diaries of troubled teenagers. Some sources have also named Linda Glovach as a co-author of the book.  Nevertheless, its popularity has endured, and as of 2014 it had remained continuously in print since its publication over four decades earlier.

Intended for a young adult audience, Go Ask Alice became a widely popular bestseller. It is praised for conveying a powerful message about the dangers of drug abuse. Go Ask Alice has also ranked among the most frequently challenged books for several decades due to its use of profanity and explicit references to sex and rape, as well as drugs.

The book was adapted into the 1973 television film Go Ask Alice, starring Jamie Smith-Jackson and William Shatner.  In 1976, a stage play of the same name, written by Frank Shiras and based on the book, was also published.



.




Memory Motel ROLLING STONES

 




The ROLLING STONES







The ROLLING STONES


MEMORY MOTEL



MEMORY MOTEL, The ROLLING STONES

Lyrics & Music : Jagger, Richards

1976

"Memory Motel" is a ballad song from English rock band the Rolling Stones' 1976 album Black and Blue. The song is credited to singer Mick Jagger and guitarist Keith Richards (named Richard at the time). It's one of the few which feature both members sharing lead vocals. The song is more than seven minutes long, one of the longest by the Rolling Stones.


The title comes from an actual motel in Montauk, on Long Island. The lyrics to the song have long drawn speculation as to who the "Hannah baby" in the lyrics refer to. Carly Simon is often a name considered, due to Jagger's descriptions of the woman throughout the song. Jagger describes her thus:Jagger began writing the song before beginning the Stones' Tour of the Americas '75 while staying with Richards at Andy Warhol's house in Montauk, New York and finished it while on tour. This is reflected in the song's lyrics where Jagger describes having to leave for Baton Rouge, where the Stones played two warm up shows at Louisiana State University, and where he describes subsequent experiences on the road.

Hannah honey was a peachy kind of girl; Her eyes were hazel and her nose was slightly curved....

Her eyes were hazel and her teeth were slightly curved; She took my guitar and she began to play, She sang a song to me, Stuck right in my brain... When I asked her where she headed for, "Back up to Boston, I’m singing in a bar

The lyrics talk of the fading love brought on by a one-night stand at said motel. The song describes the female subject as a strong, independent woman, comparable in many ways to the female subject of "Ruby Tuesday", with Richards repeated refrain:

She got a mind of her own and she use it well...





Andy Warhol's Compound

Montauk, New York





KEEF Cooking at ANDY WARHOL'S House

MONTAUL, Long Island


The BADASS COOKBOOK






The MEMORY MOTEL

MONTAUK, NY








The ROLLING STONES








 





5th Dimension Marilyn Mccoo

 



The 5th DIMENSION

with Marilyn Mccoo





"IF I COULD REACH YOU"

The 5th DIMENSION

Featuring Marilyn Mccoo




This is a beautiful poignant Love Song by the 5th Dimension. It's beautiful, and hauntinly sad. Yes, it's the 5th DImension, but the song is really all lead vocalist Marilyn Mccoo with her passionate hearfelt rendition of the song. Man, can you feel it?

It's about a woman, obviously, madly in Love with a man. They are together, and she's telling him, don't go, it's hours until down.

She love him so very deeply, and she's trying to reach him. Obviously, he doesn't love her nearly as much as she does, which sound like its as dep as love can be. She making a plea to find a way to really show him, just how deep her love is, "If I could reach you some how."

Damn, miss Mccoo really delivers the love and passion the song is meant to convey, and her interpretation surely does that. This was one of the most beautiful love songs of the 1970s, or any era for that matter. Major Kudos to the lovely Miss Marilyn Mccoo.






Remembering AMY WINEHOUSE









The MONA LISA









Tuesday, October 19, 2021

Sinatra Old Blue Eyes

 




"Ol BLUE EYES"

FRANCIS ALBERT SINATRA






SINATRA









FRANK SINATRA







SUNDAY SAUCE

alla SINATRA

alla BELLINO







LINCOLN CONTINENTAL

1966


by BELLINO





FRANK SINATRA















Thursday, October 14, 2021

Wednesday, October 13, 2021

Woodstock Festival Jimi Hendrix

 



WOODSTOCK MUSIC FESTIVAL

"Three DAYS of PEACE LOVE & MUSIC"




This is a replica of a vintage poster of The Woodstock Music Festival, held in 1969, in Upstate New York, on Max Yasgur's Farm in Bethel, NY .. It was billed as "3 Days of Peace Love & Music" and is etched in American Pop Culture. Some of the bands who played at the music festival included : Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, The Grateful Dead, Creedence Clearwater Revival, and Crosby Stills Nash & Young.






WOODSTOCK MUSIC FESTIVAL

VINTAGE POSTER (Replica)









JIMI HENDRIX

by Bellino







Jimi Hendrix